A week left before the botanically inspired art exhibition closes

Exhibition: Exact Imagination: 300 Years of Botanically Inspired Art in South Africa

Artists: Various

Venue: Standard Bank Gallery

Dates: 8 October – 6 December 2014

The exhibition Exact Imagination: 300 Years of Botanically Inspired Art in South Africa, now on display at Standard Bank Gallery, closes on 6 December 2014.

Originating out of a desire to showcase the extraordinary national treasure of botanical illustrations in the South African National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI) collection, and extended by curator Cyril Coetzee, Exact Imagination: 300 Years of Botanically Inspired Art in South Africa brings together three intersecting themes: botanical illustrations from SANBI and other collections; contemporary botanically inspired fine art; and southern African objects of material culture made from a variety of grasses, reeds and creepers.

If you’re interested in plants and botanical art don’t miss the opportunity to see this exhibition and to view some of the treasures which have been brought into view from a number of special collections.

NOTES TO EDITORS:

A note on Standard Bank as one of Africa’s greenest banks

Standard Bank strives to be an environmentally responsible corporate citizen. This is evidenced in the many initiatives that the bank supports and in the measures that it takes as an institution to ensure the sustainability of the renewable and non-renewable resources on which the bank and its customers depend, to operate now and in the future. Standard Bank has received significant external recognition for its achievements in this regard. In 2013 Standard Bank was ranked Africa’s greenest bank and the 12th greenest bank globally in the Bloomberg Markets Magazine’s Top 40 Greenest Banks rankings. The bank’s new Rosebank building, completed in 2013, was awarded a five-star rating for design by the Green Building Council of South Africa.

CAPTIONS FOR IMAGES

Keith Struthers, Protea repens: Flower Head Path Curves Created by a Morphological Field, 2014. Photographic print. Private collection

Karel Nel, Elegies to the Forest, 2001.Red pigment, baobab fibre, 171 x 61 cm. Private collection.

Karel Nel, Elegies to the Forest, 2001. Charcoal, baobab fibre, 173 x 45 cm. Private collection.

Karel Nel, Elegies to the Forest, 2005. Coco de mer leaf, 280 x 60 cm. Private collection.

Angeline Masuku, Basket, undated. Plant fibre, 145cm (height) x 73cm (diameter). Wits Art Museum.

William Kentridge, Dutch iris, 1992-1997. Etching and aquatint, 123 x 80,5 cm. Private collection.

Walter Oltmann, Cactus, 2014. Aluminium wire and rods, 120 x 120 x 85 cm. Private collection.

Helmut Starcke, Elegies to the Slender Shrub, Study #1, 2013. Acrylic on canvas, 120 x 100 cm. Circa Gallery.

Esta Zulu, Large spiral basket, 2014. Woven Agave sisalana and Lutinzi grass, 60 x 120 x 23 cm. Standard Bank Corporate Art Collection.

Stefanus Rademeyer, Spiral Forest, 2010. Pure pigment ink on archival cotton paper, 61 x 61 cm. Private collection.

Michelle Thomas, Gerbera, 2007. Linocut on paper, 120 x 80 cm. University of Cape Town Collections.

Cythna Letty (1895-1985), Rhodhypoxis baurii; Vellozia retinervis,1963.  Watercolour; 23 x 15,5 cm. South African National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI).

Willem Boshoff, Garden of Words I, 1982 – 1997. Wooden blocks, printed-paper, safety glass, 600 x 200 cm. Private collection.

John Herschel (1792 – 1871), Cyrtanthus obliquus, 1834. Watercolour over pencil camera lucida drawing, 24,5 x 19,5 cm. Brenthurst Library.

Auriol Batten, Gazania Krebsiana, c 1980. Watercolour and graphite, 86 x 65cm. South African National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI).

Auriol Batten (1918 – ), Scadoxus Puniceus, 1980. Watercolour and graphite, 86 x 54cm. South African National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI).

Ellaphie Ward-Hilhorst (1920- 1994), Pelargonium lobatum (Burm.F.) L’Hèrit, 1988. Watercolour and pencil, 30 x 23 cm. Brenthurst Library.

Georg Dionysius Ehret (1708-1770), Aloe Ferox, 1737. 75 x 55 cm. South African National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI).

Author: PR Officer

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